INNOVATIVE CULTURE

Does Your Facility Management Provider Have an Innovative Culture?
ll of us have the experience of working in two cultures. In one culture we go to work wearily knowing that our ideas will be dismissed and ignored. In the second, we happily go to work knowing that we are listened to and respected.

It is with that scenario in mind that I aim to lay the ground work for an examination of how management culture can help people innovate when they are providers of various facilities management. We have over 1600 kinds of clients who all have different aims. Our clients expect innovation and out of the box thinking. Our goal is to help them realize who has a climate of thoughtful innovation.

We know that companies that create facility management programs will talk about creating a space where they encourage such a culture. Their written materials will suggest to all that this is the kind of culture they can find when working with such a company. My plan is to find out which companies really mean it.

A prior client comes to mind. The client recounted how all she essentially needed to do was send out me too stickers rather than contact them directly. She was startled to realize that the presentations offered were virtually identical. On further consideration, she realized that all she needed to do was send out materials to them and have them return them with the same sticker attached.

If a provider offering is sent as workplace, facility, quality of life, environmental services or anything else the ability to deliver on the promised innovation is solely a reflection of their own culture as well as the culture they have created with the client. Whether you already have an existing provider or you are considering entering into a new contract with one here are some questions to ask yourself first:

Questions to Help Determine if the Provider Has A Culture That Stresses Innovation:

  • Is their leadership focused on the future rather than the past?
  • Does management present a united front and accept responsibility?
  • Are all interactions with them as straight forward as possible?
  • Does the language they use stress joint problem solving and mutual responsibility?
  • Do they consistently delivering outcomes for you, without just saying that they have merely completed or all basic tasks that were asked of them?

All of us can easily add a few more questions to this list. The point being made here is that those engaged in Facility Managment (FM) may have many of the same basic components and even the same extras when you compare each one. The difference lies in people who are able to fully realize the benefits any relationship with the given FM Provider will be able to promise as well as being able to sustain those benefits while gaining small improvement in daily operations that is part and parcel of the provider’s basic management culture. Such cultural elements become ever more critical when services are being monitored and integrated into a full whole.